Archive for the ‘Human Resources’ Category

Showcasing Emotional Intelligence on your Resume

Article contributed by guest author Patricia Edwards

Show ’em your Career Smarts…emotional intelligence that is

Show 'em your Emotional Intelligence

Unless you are alone and counting beans in a cave, the ability to understand yourself and others, communicate and influence others are all critical skills and abilities of career success. With increased emphasis on collaboration and diversity, EI is becoming even more important  and companies are hiring with those attributes in mind.

What is EI?

EI is generally defined as a person’s ability to understand and manage his/her own thoughts and emotions as well having insight into others and responding in such a way to influence outcomes.  Generally speaking, the higher levels of EI you have, the more easily you can sell your ideas to others, resolve conflict, inspire and lead teams in complex and ever changing work environments.

How can I present my EI in my resume?

Start with the job posting or job description.  If it requires interpersonal communication skills, ability to work with a team or manage other people, you have a competitive edge if you can showcase those abilities on the resume.  Simply saying “I have high emotional intelligence” is not enough and may, in fact, create question since two dimensions of EI are “reality testing and self regard”.  Rather than list communications as a strength, list examples of how you:

  • overcame objections to influence a decision
  • communicated a controversial message with positive consequences
  • increased sales team effectiveness
  • improved patient satisfaction scores
  • resolved conflict between two opposing business units

Do you control your own emotions well under stress?  Highlighting that much needed ability can be accomplished by describing how you have responded well to emotionally stressful situations:

  • have you been able to manage conflicting priorities and assignments?
  • have you met demanding deadlines?
  • were you able to exceed a difficult sales quota?

Have others told you that you are insightful and read others’ emotions well?  Describe specific circumstances in your career when you used that ability.  For example:

  • if assigned to improve a process, you may have designed questions and facilitated focus groups to solicit ideas from people most impacted
  • if involved in a merger of two business groups, you may have conducted a needs assessment to gain concensus before pursuing any change

When showcasing your EI, be mindful of the position and work environment.  Customer service, sales, human resources, medical delivery, or research all have industry specific responsibilities.  Conflict resolution might look different in different work settings; however, if you have ever managed a team of employees or were responsible for firing someone, you can certainly speak to your emotional intelligence competence.

Remember:  specificity speaks louder than generality.  Your resume can briefly explain the situation and provide the hiring manager with good discussion starters for the interview.  Be sure to be prepared with details to expand upon your top three EI traits.  You will make a very favorable impression during the interview.

Speaking of interviews…

Most companies ask behavioral interview questions to determine how candidates might fit into the organization.  Many organizations also use EI interview questions to hire and promote.  The questions answer:

  • stress – what are your hot buttons
  • how you relate in conflict situations
  • what motivates you to do your best
  • how you define your own work success

Not just for Execs

Lest you think this is only used for manager positions, this type of screening and interviewing is common in healthcare, customer service and sales, financial services and most other professions. Here’s an example.  A leading collection agency uses EI interview questions to determine candidates’ levels of optimism and self esteem.  It turns out that the perfect candidate for this company possess fairly  low optimism and very high self esteem.

How can you measure your high EI?

Options include online EI assessments or working with someone certified to report out detailed findings and work with you toward a customized development plan.

Want to learn more about emotional intelligence and your job search or career success?  I help professionals and executives get hired by designing strategic job searches. Contact me at Patricia@CareerWisdomCoach.com or tweet me @CareerSmartz.

L-O-V-E: How to make it last

Article contributed by Amy Sargent

L, is for the way you look, at me
O, is for the only one, I see
V, is very very, extraordinary, and
E, is even more than anyone that you adore…

Most likely you’re familiar with the jaunty 1965 Nat King Cole song. It’s been the theme music in romantic comedies and played on radio stations for generations. It so very well describes the giddy, elevated feeling we experience when falling in love. Whether it be in a romantic relationship, a business partnership, a friendship, a new work team, or a new job — the sparkling freshness at the beginning of a relationship can send you down the hallways dancing and humming. But it’s not long after the wear and tear of life sets in that those feelings can quickly turn to disillusion and discouragement.  We’ve all experienced it. What starts out as the opportunity of a lifetime turns into the ball and chain around our necks, similar to how that new car smell is so quickly replaced by the odorous aroma of abandoned fast food wrappers left lying on the floor. Falling in love doesn’t seem to be the issue. Staying in love is another story.

How do we prevent the adversities of life from ruining our relationships? Jack Canfield, an American author and motivational speaker, says this:

“Successful people maintain a positive focus in life no matter what is going on around them. They stay focused on their past successes rather than their past failures, and on the next action steps they need to take to get them closer to the fulfillment of their goals rather than all the other distractions that life presents to them.” 

Research shows that people who are able to maintain a positive mindset have better relationships. Robert Ackerman, researcher at the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences (University of Texas), worked with middle school students to assess how well they resolved conflict with their parents, and videotaped the subjects for over 17 years. With nearly 20 years of data at his fingertips, he discovered that kids who grew up with loving, supporting parents, exercising positive communication and warmth, were more likely to experience adult romantic relationships that were positive.* To quote Ackerman:

“I think that studying more positive behaviors is important because it may shed more insight on how to better enhance romantic relationships.” 

How is your positivity–or lack of–affecting your relationships?  If you struggle with letting negativity get a hold of you when life gets tough, here are a few things you could being to look at:

  • What are your core beliefs about adversity?  Do you see it as fate or something you can control?  Do you see suffering as part of being human or a result of particular actions?  Do you see setbacks as having long-term effects or are they short-lived?
  • Start listening to your self-talk when adversity strikes. Do you tend to go to an “I can do this” place or a “I’m doomed” place?
  • Ask an honest question:  is there anything about the drama that accompanies adversity that you enjoy?
  • Can you look back on past adversity and see that you overcame the obstacle and moved on, or are you still experiencing negative effects from that event to this day?

We all know it’s not about having a happy, trouble-free life that brings joy. It’s more about our ability to roll with the punches (resiliency) and allow the event(s) to shape us into better human beings. Kahlil Gibran, a Lebanese-American artist and poet, put it this way:

The deeper that sorrow carves into your being, the more joy you can contain. Is not the cup that holds your wine the very cup that was burned in the potter’s oven? And is not the lute that soothes your spirit, the very wood that was hollowed with knives? When you are joyous, look deep into your heart and you shall find it is only that which has given you sorrow that is giving you joy. When you are sorrowful look again in your heart, and you shall see in truth that you are weeping for that which has been your delight.”

Finding a life coach to work with you to combat negative tendencies can be a good first step of heading down the road of positivity, which can lead to healthier, happier relationships.  Though it doesn’t happen overnight, behavior can be changed, and with some help you can begin to shift your focus from the negative to the positive.

Two in love can make it
Take my heart and please don’t break it
Love was made for me and you
Love was made for me and you
Love was made for me and you.

  • (2013. Study finds good marriages more likely for teens of happy homes. University of Texas at Dallas News Center (n.d.): n. pag. Web. http://www.utdallas.edu/news/2013/3/21-22501_Study-Finds-Good-Marriages-More-Likely-for-Teens-o_article-wide.html?WT.mc_id=NewsHomePage).

How will you navigate the journey ahead?

2017-new-yearAs you look out at the challenges ahead in 2017, consider equipping yourself with tools to help you navigate the peaks and valleys that life brings.

Social and emotional intelligence (S+EI) is the ability to be aware of how you and others are feeling, in the moment, and to manage your behavior appropriately. Do you know anyone who could use a little help with this? We all have behaviors that may be tripping us up, derailing our careers, and negatively affecting the quality of our relationships.

The good news is, behavior can be changed, and we’d like to help you learn how.

Our critically-acclaimed online Coach Certification Course in S+EI gives you  skills and expertise to create a unique niche in your coaching practice as well as help those you work with increase their S+EI for happier, more productive lives. Whether you are a coach, an HR professional, a leader, or an individual looking to navigate the journey ahead, consider adding the skill of S+EI coaching to your toolkit in the coming year.

Learn more at http://the-isei.com/all_course_list.aspx or contact us at info@the-isei.com. We look forward to walking alongside you!

Does Emotional Intelligence Really Affect the Bottom Line?

money-down-the-drain

 

Article contributed by guest author Dawn Cook

By now you’ve probably heard the term Emotional Intelligence and you might have a good idea what it means.  Being smart with your emotions is the simplest answer, although not a complete one, and will suffice for now.  Before we determine how or if it affects the bottom line, let’s take a look at what emotional intelligence looks like in terms of behavior.  Here are twelve keystone examples.

Someone with high emotional intelligence is someone who:

  1. inspires trust and commitment to goals
  2. exercises good decision-making under duress
  3. bounces back easily from frustrations and disappointments
  4. resists the urge to negatively react to condescending emails or comments
  5. communicates with confidence without being arrogant or overbearing
  6. recovers quickly from stress
  7. can see the silver lining in or make the most of tough situations
  8. builds rapport easily and makes others feel heard and understood
  9. handles conflict with ease and grace
  10. influences others to take action
  11. demonstrates compassion by helping others
  12. sets healthy boundaries

Naturally there are many more ways to detect emotional intelligence in the workplace, but this gives you the gist.  So how does this translate to improving business?  How does it impact bottom line profitability? Though a bit difficult to measure sometimes, leaders with high EQ – emotional intelligence quotient – experience these types of outcomes:

  1. They can focus on new opportunities since there are few employee issues.
  2. Turnover, recruiting and training costs are low.
  3. Engagement, productivity and creativity are high.
  4. There is high trust, so the speed of doing business increases while cost decreases.
  5. Communication is open, honest, frequent and effective.
  6. Teams are motivated and collaborate well together.
  7. Little time is spent gossiping at the water cooler.
  8. Change initiatives are successful.
  9. Financial goals are met or exceeded.
  10. The organization enjoys regular growth.

So do these things affect the bottom line?  Would they affect yours?

Improve your decisions. Use your emotions.

decisionArticle contributed by guest author John Thalheimer.

It was late on Tuesday; Julie had to make a decision before she left work. It had been a long day of meetings, project reviews, and conversations with her team. As she walked into her office, she sat down in the armchair she usually reserved for guests to her office. The decision she had to make weighed heavily on her. Instinctively she knew however she decided it would impact the performance of her team for the next year at least.

On her desk sat the resumes of the two candidates that would replace her operations manager. Over the last two weeks, she had narrowed down the candidate pool to these two resumes, and now she had to make a decision.

One of the primary responsibilities of executives is to make decisions for the betterment of the organization. In fact, executives make hundreds of decisions each week that impact the direction of their organizations. In my work with leaders, most of them believe that making rational decisions are an important aspect of their leadership. For the important decisions, the leader usually has a very systematic way to make the decision. Ben Franklin introduced us to the pro vs. con list that many executives use today.

My way is to divide half a sheet of paper by a line into two columns; writing over the one Pro and the other Con. Then during three or four days’ consideration, I put down under the different heads short hints of the different motives, which at different time occur to me, for or against the measure. When I have thus got them altogether in one view, I endeavor to estimate their respective weights…” Ben Franklin

If you google decision making, you will get over 133 million different responses. Obviously, we are obsessed with making good decisions. And no wonder with the importance of each decision we make as leaders. And in a way Ben Franklin had it right, the importance of understanding the pros and cons of the variety of choices is still paramount in our decision-making process. Unfortunately, it is not a straightforward as reviewing the facts and making the best rational decision.

As humans, our emotions play a large way in how we make decisions. Our emotions evolved to coordinate our various human operating systems. For instance, the functions of sleep and fear of a predator require different reactions from the brain and body. If the brain was receiving cues from the outside world it was time to sleep while at the same time a lion was stalking us, our species would have been extinct a long time ago.

In today’s society, how we perceive the world impacts our emotions and in turn, influences how we behave including how we make decisions. For instance, when we are deciding between various software providers, we may eliminate one because of a gut reaction that they are not forthright. Maybe the vendor reminds us of time where a vendor let us down. Maybe the vendor triggers an anxious response by shoving the contract in front of you. Maybe the vendor pushes your respect button by calling you, Miss or Son. In any case, this “gut reaction” is an emotional response to an internal trigger that may or may not be accurate.

Our emotional responses are not necessarily rational and may be based on an environmental trigger of which we are unaware. When I was purchasing a new stove for my house, one of the factors I used to make my decision was that it had to be a gas stove. I rationalized this by reminding myself that all of my chef friends said that it is best to cook on gas. It wasn’t until I walked into my grandmother’s house and saw her gas stove that I realized the motive for me to buy a gas stove was a nostalgia for the time spent in my grandmother’s kitchen.

How can we stop having emotions impact our decisions? We don’t. They are a critical part of our decision-making process. In most cases, they provide us a deeper understanding of the decision and how it relates to our internal value system. This connection between our values and the ultimate choice is key to making the best decision possible.

Using the following rules will help us make the best decisions and allow our emotions to properly impact our decision-making process.

  1. Know exactly what you want to achieve. This may seem self-explanatory but in the work environment with its competing and at times conflicting goals, this can be a challenge for even the most experienced leader.
  2. Gather information about the various choices so that you can have a full perspective. You don’t have to get every piece of information possible. Just enough so that you feel comfortable. This is where the pro’s vs. con list can help clarify the different choices.
  3. Get other people involved in the decision-making process. (Not too many, after a certain point too many viewpoints will cause paralysis.) With complex decisions, finding good partners to help you and challenge you help you make the best decisions. It can also offset any biases you may have.
  4. Check your choices against organizational values and standards. Some choices may seem best until they are reviewed with the organizational values in mind.
  5. Finally, make a decision. Yes, your emotions will be involved in the decision-making process, that is not only acceptable and is preferred as it will allow you to react to things that which you are not aware.
  6. Review your decision and its outcomes. Did it meet your expectations? Were there unattended consequences? How did it impact the team? Does anything need to be adjusted? We are never perfect in our decision making, it is how we correct ourselves that truly matter in the long run.

Let’s get back to our heroine, she needs to get home.

Julie stood up and walked towards her desk. She picked up the two resumes. She quickly looked over them, visualizing the two people in her mind. She smiled to herself and picked up the phone and called the Director of HR with her choice. In the end, she realized that it was her decision, and she knew that her intuition would not steer her wrong.

She headed home to her family, wondering what her husband had chosen for dinner.

 

 

Hired or Not? Emotional Intelligence can make the difference

Article contributed by guest author Patricia Edwards

Emotional intelligence is often the “final” factor

If you are like most job seekers, when you read “strong people skills” and “strong technical skills” in a job posting, you may tend to gloss over the first to focus on selling your technical talent and experience to the prospective employer.  In fact, we often refer to people skills as the “soft” skills and that sounds secondary to anything else we might possess. WRONG!

More and more companies hire for attitude because they have been burned when hiring purely for technical skills and knowledge.  What seemed like a dream candidate turned out, occasionally, to be a problem employee who was not successful.

Hired or Not?

Organizations often use behavioral interview questions which are founded on Emotional Intelligence, referred to as the “Other Kind of Smart” like Harvey Deutschendorf and Daniel Goleman. The latter wrote a book, Emotional Intelligence:  Why It Can Matter More than IQ, which soared to the top of the New York Times bestseller list for a year.  Additionally, some companies use

pre-employment assessments, based on soft skills to predict job related behavior or organizational fit. These tests determine the level of self-awareness a candidate possesses as well as how insightful s/he is of other people.  The higher the Emotional Intelligence, the more able the individual is to influence others, crucial to many professions including customer service, marketing and sales.

Emotional intelligence separates star performers from everyone else

Research consistently shows that people with high EQ out perform their peers and studies have shown positive correlation with high EQ and careers involving customer service, sales and, especially, management positions. They are aware of their own emotions and keep them in control, enabling them to focus on their work, when others around them are adding to the drama and non productivity.

Yes!  You can showcase your emotional intelligence in your resume, cover letter and LinkedIn profile

By sharing your success stories and achievements, you can really stand out against your competition by showing how you:

  • Develop rapport with your work contacts
  • Build trust with team members and customers
  • Manage stressful situations
  • Negotiate favorable outcomes during times of conflict
  • Nimbly navigate change

What about the interview?

Knowing how to incorporate Emotional Intelligence into an interview can also give you the competitive edge you need to ace the selection process.  Employers hire for positive attitude, resilience and cultural fit; therefore, your responses to interview questions should include examples of how you have overcome obstacles, adapted to changes and worked effectively with others. Simply saying that you possess these traits is not enough.  Go into your interview prepared to share several examples.  That way, if you have multiple levels of interviews, you can share a different example with each interviewer.

IQ may get you hired but EQ gets you up the career ladder

Emotional Intelligence also accurately forecasts leadership capability and is used often when companies identify and groom emerging leaders since that process consumes considerable investment of resources. But it is used extensively in identifying and training top sales teams and has been used by a wide variety of organizations from L’Oreal cosmetics to the United States Air Force with results of more effective hiring decisions, lower employee turnover and higher performance.
If you are interested in career advancement, understanding Emotional Intelligence is a wise investment in your development. An assessment will provide you with a baseline and the great news is that EQ can be improved over time with an individual development plan.

The power of social + emotional intelligence coaching

coaching words

Learning to coach social and emotional intelligence can enable you to help your clients unlock their fullest potential and move them past the hurdles that are slowing them down.  We believe that behavior can be changed, and as a social and emotional intelligence coach, you can learn how to guide others to begin making behavior shifts to enhance their growth.  Add this unique skill set to your coaching expertise!

From our highly-acclaimed Coach Certification Course to our interactive and informative Specialty Courses, you can fill your schedule this fall with social and emotional intelligence classes at the Institute. All of our courses are online and recorded in case you need to miss one or two.  Our courses are highly interactive and rich with applicable tools you can begin using immediately in your coaching practice or with those you lead. And you’ll earn recertification credits from the ICF, HRCI, or SHRM upon completion! Payment plans are available.

“This was an excellent course and one that I would highly recommend to anyone interested in coaching social and emotional intelligence. The course was very well designed and the facilitators were excellent. Thank you for the wonderful and informative experience! ”
Jan O’Brien, Social + Emotional Intelligence Certified Coach® 

Online course starting August 9th: Leader As Coach

Earn 6 recertification credits from the ICF, HRCI, or SHRM in this highly-acclaimed, six-week online course from the Institute for Social + Emotional Intelligence.

 Leader As Coach

 Tuesdays, August 9th – September 13th

 6-7 pm Eastern Time

 

This course is designed for coaches and HR professionals who wish to bring a complete turnkey training program on coaching skills into their client organizations and teach supervisors, managers, executives and others how to take a coach approach in their leadership and management. In this 6-session, 6 weeks, once per week course, you will learn how to teach your executive coaching clients:

  • What managerial/leadership coaching is, and why and how it works
  • The tools and skills they need to develop to take a coach approach to leadership and management
  • How to conduct a coaching conversation
  • An overview of the leadership coaching process (including gathering data on performance, how to discuss and provide feedback on recent performance, how to develop an action plan for moving forward, how to implement the development / action plan and how to evaluate continued progress and performance)
  • How they can support and challenge their best performers to greater levels of success
  • How they can integrate coaching seamlessly into their everyday interactions with their direct reports
  • How they can shift their mindset from supervisor to coach

This course provides you with a complete set of materials to do a two-day training with your executive clients (and their teams), including PowerPoint slides and interactive participant exercises. The course meets 6 times, once per week for one hour. Cost is $795.

info@the-isei.com | 303-325-5176 | www.the-isei.com

Become a certified social + emotional intelligence coach!

Learn to coach social and emotional intelligence and become certified to administer the Social + Emotional Intelligence Profile (SEIP)®.

This highly-acclaimed course is conveniently delivered online by webinar, so there’s no need for expensive travel or time out of the office. Each class is a highly-interactive 90 minutes, and meets once a week for 8 weeks. Class participants report they learn a great deal from their colleagues in the classes, as well as from their expert instructor.

Our course is priced at $1,595 and payment plans are available. Upon completion of the course, you will earn 12 recertification credits from the ICF, SHRM, or HRCI.

ISEI Coach Certification Course

July 12 – August 30, 2016

3-4:30 pm ET

 Have questions?  Contact us!

www.the-isei.com | info@the-isei.com | 303-325-5176

 

 

Free webinar on social and emotional intelligence

connecting

Join us on Monday, June 27th, at 5pm Eastern Time (U.S.), for an informative 30 minute introduction to social and emotional intelligence! Learn what it is and how it is vital to our relationships, both at home and at the office. Each participant will have the opportunity to complete a free Social + Emotional Intelligence Profile (SEIP)® to determine your own strengths and areas of growth — including a 40-page downloadable report.

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Free Webinar on Social + Emotional Intelligence
Monday, June 27th, 2016
5-5:30pm ET
www.the-isei.com | info@the-isei.com | 303-325-5176

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