Archive for the ‘Organizational Culture’ Category

Five Ways The Most Effective Leaders Manage Their Emotions

The best managers know how to keep their emotions in check and focus on building a healthy team.

Article submitted by guest author Harvey Deutschendorf

Five Ways The Most Effective Leaders Manage Their Emotions
[PHOTO: H. ARMSTRONG ROBERTS/CLASSICSTOCK/GETTY IMAGES]

Soft skills have garnered increasing attention in the workplace over the last 20 years. In fact, emotional intelligence is one of the fastest growing job skills, according to a report by the World Economic Forum.

Ironically, those are the very skills hiring managers say the latest crop of college graduates lacks as they’ve focused on honing their technological prowess. Yet managing our emotions effectively in the workplace is a major component of success for all of us.

Emotions running amok can damage those who work directly with us. Although employees may get away with an occasional lapse in emotional control, leaders are not afforded that leeway. A leader who is not managing his or her emotions well can wreak severe havoc on an organization, seriously damaging employee morale, retention, and ultimately the bottom line. Every reaction–positive or negative–will have consequences for all those who are under them and effect the overall success of the company.

Here are five ways effective leaders manage their emotions.

1. THEY KNOW WHEN AND HOW TO SHARE

It isn’t necessary or healthy for leaders to be unemotional robots and keep all their feelings inside. Effective leaders are able to use their emotions to connect with others through their ability to share the feelings that enhance relationships with their direct reports.

Whether an employee is feeling joy over a successful sales week or sadness over a family member passing, an effective leader is able to express emotions to let that person know they are connecting with them on a heart level.

While their emotions are under control, they know what to express and how much to let out in the circumstance. For example, if someone just lost a family member, the manager could express how they felt when they lost someone close to them and how good it felt to be supported. Then, they could ask the grieving person if they needed anything. Depending on the closeness of the relationship, they could put a hand on the person’s back or shoulder, or offer a hug.

2. THEY DO WHAT’S RIGHT INSTEAD OF WHAT’S POPULAR

There are many instances when leaders are tempted to make popular decisions as these will bring them instant feelings of relief from a pressing and difficult situation. However, effective managers overcome the urge to give in to what is popular and opt for what is right. This requires a great deal of self-confidence and courage.

If a particular unpopular employee was being subjected to ridicule and being ostracized, the manager could support that employee and confront his or her coworkers in order to stop the behavior. This may cause resentment from the offender, but it enforces the idea that bullying isn’t tolerated, and that’s more important for effective managers than being popular.

3. THEY TRUST THEIR INTUITION

When struggling with a decision, effective managers are able to tune into and use their gut instincts to make decisions, even though there may be compelling reasons for not doing so. That’s because they’ve relied on intuition in the past and trust it will be the best guide when there isn’t an obvious answer.

For example, they might make a decision to hire someone outside of the company who they feel would be a great fit instead of promoting someone from the inside who is popular, but doesn’t have the vision or initiative to take on the new role.

4. THEY ROUTINELY FIGHT APATHY, INERTIA, AND PROCRASTINATION

Ever have a day when you felt like doing very little, leaving things undone until later, or the next day? Perhaps you’re feeling tired, or just having a bad day or week. We’ve all had those days.

Leaders share this struggle but don’t have the luxury of giving in. Others depend on them to take action and get things done–even when they don’t they feel like it. They’ve disciplined themselves to do whatever it takes, regardless of how they feel. If they need to have a difficult conversation with an employee or customer, they’ll go through with it even if they’re tempted to put it off for another day.

5. THEY LOOK FOR SOLUTIONS, NOT SOMEONE TO BLAME

One of the easiest traps to fall into is to avoid responsibility when things aren’t going well. Poor leaders look for ways to shift the blame to others when things go wrong. It’s easier to avoid responsibility by pinning it on others or on outside circumstances–but that isn’t leadership.

Effective leaders immediately begin to look for solutions. They find out what went wrong to avoid the same problem in the future. They’re more interested in using the failure as a learning opportunity and moving on from it, rather than spending time and energy looking for scapegoats.

Often the reason for the problem is a breakdown in communication between leaders and those assisting them. Effective leaders find out where that happened and readily admit that their instructions may not have been clear enough.

This also creates an opportunity to reassure employees who are reluctant to admit they didn’t understand for fear of appearing stupid, and let them know their boss won’t think less of them for asking for clarification. It’s crucial for good managers not to show any signs of frustration if what they thought was a straightforward request wasn’t understood at first.

Effective leaders are acutely aware of their feelings and know their responsibilities toward staff, customers, and the organization. This isn’t easy–it takes effort. But they’ve worked on themselves to develop their abilities to keep their emotions in check when necessary and show them when the situation calls for it.

Are you flexible?

“No matter what twists and turns your life offers you, your ability to be adaptable and flexible will help you to stay open to all of the hidden gifts that difficulty may offer. ” –Mandy Ingber

Article contributed by Amy Sargent

The routine of habits

We are creatures of habit. Consider, for example, how you prepare your morning coffee each day. I’m guessing you go through the same exact steps, day by day, whether it’s stopping by your favorite local coffee shop and ordering that same drink you love, or whether you make your own, carefully measuring coffee grounds into your coffeemaker and adding the same amount of sweetener and creamer to your steaming mug.  Or, reflect on the route you take to work. Do you tend to turn down the same streets each day or change things up?

Oxford dictionary defines a habit as a settled or regular tendency or practice, especially one that is hard to give up. Habits often imply a refusal to flex. On the contrary, flexibility, or personal agility, is our ability to anticipate and respond rapidly and willingly to changing conditions.

Does your day-to-day life consist more of habits or agility?

“It is not the strongest of the species that survive, nor the most intelligence, but those most responsive to change.” — Charles Darwin

Habits in and of themselves are not a negative thing. They are our way of getting necessary tasks done with a minimal need for brain engagement. You most likely could write down the steps you take from when you wake up to when you taste that first sip of piping hot coffee without much effort.  And your route to work — you could draw the map in your sleep. Getting dressed for work, brushing your teeth, filling the car with fuel when the tank is low — all tasks that need to be done yet don’t take a lot of effort to figure out how to do them. You’ve been doing these for years. Forming a habit around these seemingly mundane tasks allow you to accomplish with minimal thinking.

A study was done at Massachusetts Institute of Technology to determine how much of our behavior is fueled by habits.  The researchers outfitted students with a box that monitored their activities throughout the day–sleeping, eating, walking, working, going to class, talking with friends, etc. They discovered that a whopping 90% of our daily activities follow predictable routines! And many of these routines are simply reactions to the world around us. John Bargh, psychologist at Yale University,  says this: “…most of a person’s everyday life is determined not by their conscious intentions and deliberate choices, but by mental processes put into motion by the environment.”

Many habits can lead to a healthier, happier lifestyle. Take for example, your routine to eat healthy food, to exercise every day, or to spend quiet time in mediation or self-reflection. Habits such as these enable you to live the life you want, whether it be to achieve a level of health, find peace of mind, or relieve stress.

Habits get us into trouble, however, when a need for change arises and we refuse to respond. Some habits lead to poor physical health, such as overeating. Some lead to a lack of connection, such as spending too much time staring at your cell phone. At work, a refusal to flex can lead to frustration when the new manager arrives, or an inability to work well with others if you’re tied to always doing things the way you want to.

Signs of personal agility

Not sure if you are flexible? Take this short quiz (adapted from the ISEI Coaching Toolkit developed by Dr. Laura Belsten) to find how you score in personal agility. Read each statement and determine how frequently you demonstrate the behavior, on a scale of 1 to 5 (1=Always, 2=Almost Always, 3=Occasionally, 4-Almost Never, 5=Never):

  1. I find it easy to operate out of my comfort zone.
  2. I am comfortable with change.
  3. It’s okay when things are ‘up in the air’.
  4. I readily embrace new ideas and concepts.
  5. I quickly make decisions and solve problems even when there’s not enough information.
  6. I shift gears quickly when changes arise.
  7. I don’t curse change nor do I let change put me in a bad mood.
  8. I like to learn new skills and new ways of doing things.
  9. I can take action without having the complete picture.
  10. I readily embrace shifting priorities.
  11. I am comfortable if I have to do things differently than they’ve always been done.
  12. Others view me as someone who is curious in new ways of doing things.
  13. I am comfortable working with people who are different from me in their thinking and problem-solving.
  14. I anticipate change and respond readily.
  15. I can juggle multiple demands with ease (and a smile).
  16. I am comfortable with risk and uncertainty.
  17. I tend to be an early adopter (of things like technology, new ideas, new procedures).
  18. I adjust quickly to the need for change even if the facts available to me are limited.
  19. I happily rearrange my schedule to make sure new priorities and deadlines are met.
  20. I am comfortable with chaos and complexity.

Total Score ________

If your score is:

1-20 = Your personal agility is high

21-40 = Your personal agility is moderately high

41-60 = Your personal agility is moderate

61-80 = Your personal agility has room for improvement

81-100 = your personal agility needs improvement

It’s about comfort

Why are some resistant to change, and instead want to cling to habits and old ways, even if those ways are no longer serving them?

Habits are comfortable, like a favorite pair of socks or a warm, cozy blanket. Carol Kinsey Goman, an executive coach and author of the book This Isn’t the Company I Joined: How to Lead in a Business Turned Upside Down,  writes this in an article entitled, The Effects of Change on the Brain:
Change jerks us out of this comfort zone by stimulating the prefrontal cortex, an energy-intensive section of the brain responsible for insight and impulse control. But the prefrontal cortex is also directly linked to the most primitive part of the brain, the amygdala (the brain’s fear circuitry, which in turn controls our “flight or fight” response). And when the prefrontal cortex is overwhelmed with complex and unfamiliar concepts, the amygdala connection gets kicked into high gear. All of us are then subject to the physical and psychological disorientation and pain that can manifest in anxiety, fear, depression, sadness, fatigue or anger.” (http://www.sideroad.com/Leadership/change-effects-brain.html)

The thing is, change threatens to push us out of our comfort zone.  And we love our comfort zones! But personal agility is increasingly becoming a vital self-management skill. Change is inevitable. It occurs within all areas of our lives — our kids grow up and leave home, coworkers come and go, relationships shift, job descriptions mold into a new set of tasks, and our bodies — need we mention our bodies and the aging process?!  Instead of fighting the need to flex to ever-changing situations, it’s more advantageous to learn how to get comfortable with ambiguity, be adaptable, and shift gears when needed.

Where to start? 

“Change might not be fast and it isn’t always easy. But with time and effort, almost any habit can be reshaped.” — Charles Duhigg

Though change can be difficult, learning to flex and move in a new direction will help you navigate the ever-changing world around you.  Here are a few ideas to try:

  • Acknowledge and accept the normal human responses to change:  denial, resistance, exploration, and new beginnings. Think of a change you are currently being asked to navigate. Which phase are you experiencing? Have you gotten stuck there? Simply recognizing where you are in the process can help you see the need to move forward.
  • Recognize what is in your control, and what isn’t. Focus on the tasks you can control.  Note:  Other people and their behaviors are NOT something you can control!
  • Look for people who can support you during difficult transitions.  Find someone who’s been through something similar, or who has endured a tough time and made it to the other side.
  • Let go of your preconceived ideas about ‘the way things should be.’ Be open to new perspectives and be willing to try out new ideas.
  • Get your emotions in check.  Sometimes we allow our emotions to flood and create more drama around the change than necessary. Take note of how you are feeling, and why, and spend some time processing those feelings by journaling or talking to a coach or counselor.
  • “Try it, you’ll like it.”  Sometimes the best way to navigate change is to give it a try.  Take small steps in a new direction and try it on for size.  Look for the positives, noting opportunities that may arise with the shift.

“Success today requires the agility and drive to constantly rethink, reinvigorate, react, and reinvent.” — Bill Gates

2 for 1 Coach Certification

Special Pricing for April only:  Two for the price of one!

Don’t miss this chance to receive our 12-hour online social + emotional intelligence coach training for you and one of your colleagues — two for the price of one! In April, 2019, we are offering this special opportunity to you and a colleague within your company to get certified together for the cost of one certification. It’s a $1799 savings!

Learn more at:  https://isei.worldsecuresystems.com/BookingRetrieve.aspx?ID=82864&_ga=2.158748474.1242401232.1552312628-1321862846.1533053345

Receive a free resource guide for behavioral change

Are you a coach searching for tools to help clients make behavioral shifts?

Are you an HR professional looking for practical ways to help staff members grow in areas like self-awareness, communication, leadership, collaboration, and innovation?

Are you a leader wanting resources to help guide and lead your teams toward success?

If you answered yes to any of the above, consider enrolling in our online Coach Certification Course! You’ll become a certified Social + Emotional Intelligence Coach and will receive a 200-page toolkit full of exercises and activities to use with your clients, staff, and teams to help them move past hurdles that may be tripping them up in 26 difference competencies of social + emotional intelligence. This unique niche will set you apart from others who are only focusing on personality, gifting, or skill sets and open the doors for you to incorporate social + emotional intelligence into every interaction you have with others.

Our course participants also earn 12 recertification credits from the ICF, HRCI, or SHRM.

“The toolkit is very expansive and will be a great help as our team continues their great work in the coaching field!” — David W. Tripp, CEO, Workplace Performance Inc.

Click here to learn more:

Institute for Social + Emotional Intelligence |www.the-isei.com| info@isei.com

 

Receive a free 200+ page coaching toolkit!

“The course facilitator’s knowledge of the subject matter was excellent. She not only taught from a place of expertise and experience but also welcomed the insight of others.” — Ted Riter, Empowered Leadership, S+EI Certified Coach

If you’re looking for invaluable emotional intelligence coaching resources to use with clients, consider becoming a Certified S+EI Coach!

Online class dates: November 5 – November 16, 2018*

Online class time: 12-2 pm Eastern Time (USA)

Our online Coach Certification Course will certify you to coach social + emotional intelligence and administer the Social + Emotional Intelligence Profile. It’s one of the most comprehensive, statistically-reliable and scientifically-validated S+EI instruments on the market today. The self-assessment is available in three versions: Workplace, Adult, and Youth. We also offer a 360 assessment which provides your clients with an accurate representation of what their supervisor, peers, direct reports, customers (internal and external) and others think about their performance in the 26 distinct social and emotional intelligence competencies.

As well, as part of your registration, you’ll receive 10 free self-assessments to use with clients (a $750 value) AND a 200+ page coaching toolkit, full of exercises and activities you can use to help clients, teams, and individuals increase specific competencies of S+EI.

This highly-acclaimed course can help you grow your coaching business, increase your leadership skill set, and/or enhance your offerings as a human resource professional. We have leaders, individuals, coaches, and HR reps from all around the world learn and grow from our course!

“The recommended processes for administering SEIP’s and for follow up coaching was great! The toolkit is very expansive and will be a great help as our team continues their great work in the coaching field!” — David W. Tripp, CEO, Workplace Performance Inc, S+EI Certified Coach

Our November course is a special, 2-week condensed course, to allow you to complete your certification before the busy holiday season begins. Click here for more information or to reserve a seat today:

* If these dates don’t work for you, consider our self-study course! CLICK HERE for more information.

Institute for Social + Emotional Intelligence | www.the-isei.com | 303-325-5176 | info@isei.com

Personal Power

Article submitted by guest author Laura A. Belsten, Ph.D.

Personal Power. What is it? Do you have it? How do you know? Test yourself with this quick quiz. For each question, give yourself a score from 1 to 10 points, with 1 being “I never feel this way” and 10 being “I feel this way all the time.”

  1. I am fully aware of my professional strengths and weaknesses.
  2. I am in full control of my life.
  3. I know what I want and go after it.
  4. I understand and respect myself.
  5. I can make things happen.
  6. I have the ability to get what I want.
  7. I am decisive; I can make decisions despite uncertainties and ambiguity.
  8. I feel completely comfortable voicing views that are unpopular.
  9. I go out on a limb for what is right, even if it means jeopardizing my car
  10. I’m living my life exactly as I want.

Total your responses, and see where you come out in the categories below:

High personal power (91-100): You are among the elite who have a strong sense of your own worth and capability. You live life with an “inner knowing,” a calm conviction about who you are and your ability to get the things you want and need in your life.

Moderately high (81-90): You have a greater sense of personal power than most people. Moderate (71-80): You are doing well in some areas, but may need to work on a few others.

Look back at your lower scores. Is there a theme? Can you resolve to work on this?

Moderately low (61-70): You are exercising personal power on a more limited basis, and probably need to look at specific actions you can take to boost your scores.

Low personal power (60 and below): Don’t despair! This score simply explains why life seems overwhelming and difficult at times. As you work to increase your personal power, you will experience dramatic results in how you view, respond to and address life’s challenges.

People with a highly-developed sense of personal power believe they can set the direction of their lives. They define themselves from the “inside out” (I am capable, I am creative, I speak up and do the right thing) rather than from the “outside in” (I’m a corporate executive, I’m an attorney).

The opposite of personal power is helplessness or hopelessness, crippling self-doubt, and a lack of conviction to tackle life’s tough challenges.

Personal power is a critical emotional intelligence competency that reveals itself in strong  personal presentation, in the ability to confidently take on new challenges, and quickly master  new jobs or skills. People with high personal power are catalysts, movers, and initiators who don’t hesitate to take on controversial issues and stand up for what they believe despite opposition and disagreement. Quite simply, personal power is the degree to which you believe you can meet life’s challenges and live the life you choose.

Do you have a strong sense of personal power?

Learn to coach emotional intelligence!

DATE: Thursdays, September 13 – November 1, 2018

TIME: 3-4:30 PM (ET)

LOCATION: Online

Event Details

Learn to coach social and emotional intelligence and become certified to administer the Social + Emotional Intelligence Profile (SEIP)®.

By completing the Coach Certification Course, you will earn 12 recertification credits from the ICF, HRCI, or SHRM. This course is conveniently delivered online by webinar, so there’s no need for expensive travel or time out of the office. Classes meet once a week for eight weeks. Each class is an action-packed 90 minutes, highly interactive, with a variety of case studies discussed. Class participants report they learn a great deal from their colleagues in the classes, as well as from their expert instructor.

Our full 8 week class is priced at $1,799 and includes:

  • Our course workbook (”toolkit”) with 200+ pages of worksheets, exercises and other tools you can use to bring social and emotional intelligence training and coaching into your practice
  • Customizable PowerPoint presentation
  • Certification to administer both the self and 360-versions of The Social + Emotional Intelligence Profile-Self (SEIP)®, the most comprehensive, statistically-reliable, scientifically-validated instrument on the market today. This includes the Work, Adult and Youth Editions.
  • 12 recertification credits (ICF, HRCI, or SHRM)
  • 10 free Self-SEIP® credits

Classes are kept small and availability is limited, so register today!

Attendees are expected to attend all 8 sessions, but we record the sessions in case you need to miss a class or two.

 

#emotionalintelligence #socialintelligence #EQ #coachcertification

4 Disciplines Create “The Advantage” for Growth

Article submitted by guest author Pam Watson Korbel

In my years of consulting, a few common issues arise for small and medium-sized businesses that always inhibit their growth:

  • Infighting among the executive team;
  • Failure to get out of the weeds and take the time to plan for growth;
  • Poor communication cadences leading to problems with culture and productivity;
  • Lack of appreciation for the need for a strong employee base.

One book tightly delves into all these topics – The Advantage (Jossey Bass, 2012) by Patrick Lencioni.   Known as a fable writer, in this book Lencioni focuses instead on the “how to’s” of organizational health.  I recommend it for executive teams in any industry.

Building upon the same premises that Jim Collins (Built to Last and Good to Great) and Verne Harnish (Scaling Up and Mastering the Rockefeller Habits), The Advantage starts out by laying a foundation of four disciplines necessary for strong organizational health:

1.  Build a cohesive leadership team – Anecdotally, I have found that when members of a leadership team spend a lot of time together, professionally and socially, their growth rate is faster than those who do not.  Interestingly, the personal bonds often spur the commitment to the business more than the professional bonds.  Lencioni espouses team building and makes a strong point that it is a process not an event.

2.  Create clarity – Lencioni lays out six strategic questions that every leadership team needs to answer on behalf of the company.  Beyond answering “why” the firm exists and what the culture is, the Lencioni system provides a framework for setting priorities.

Most importantly, it helps a leadership team to focus on less than a handful of matters at a time; completing them before it progresses to a new set of priorities.  In my experience, mid-market companies fail to advance when everything needs to be done today.  I have seen many companies improve revenue and profit just by reducing the number of initiatives for the company and for individuals.

3.  Overcommunicate clarity – Smart people who lead entrepreneurial growth companies often assume that their employees are as smart and agile as they are.  Generally, the employees who fit this description leave your company and start their own.  Which leaves you with people who want stability and consistency along with understanding of priorities.  And that requires that you develop a strong communication system within your company so that employees always know what is important and then they can execute.

4.  Reinforce clarity – The Advantage concludes by laying out a foundation of hiring the right employees who fit your culture and then providing high-quality feedback to each so that they are motivated to excel.  Especially in today’s knowledge-based industries, involving staff in decisions and direction keeps them motivated.  And as Ken Blanchard (The One-Minute Manager) says, “None of us is as smart as all of us.”

The bottom-line is that reading and implementing The Advantage in your company is a simple, direct way to encourage financial growth while engendering a strong team of supporters.  Lencioni lays out a process to address the four disciplines and implement them that leadership teams can manage effectively with coaching.

You can study this system by reading the book and you should also check out The Advantage app, which includes an overview of the content plus an organizational health assessment. For help with the four disciplines and implementing The Advantage, contact Pam Watson Korbel.

You’re invited: Free 1-hour webinar, “How to Coach Emotional Intelligence”

Date:  June 6, 2018

Time: 5-6 pm Eastern time

REGISTER HERE:  http://isei.iobisystems.com/BookingRetrieve.aspx?ID=75648

This FREE, interactive online webinar will give you an overview of social and emotional intelligence and its impact on individual lives, relationships, and employee engagement.

The first 20 people who register and attend this online class will receive a FREE Social + Emotional Intelligence Profile (SEIP)®, one of the most statistically-reliable and scientifically-validated S+EI instruments on the market today, to begin your own journey down the path of social and emotional intelligence.

 

Even if you can’t attend, go ahead and register and we’ll send you a recording of the webinar that you can listen to on your own time.

– Grow your business; attract more clients

– Stake out a new niche

– Expand your coaching expertise skills and knowledge

“Leaders with higher social & emotional intelligence produce more powerful business results and greater profitability.”

–Steven Stein

Add EQ Coaching to your expertise!

  Online Coach Certification Course

DATE: Wednesdays, June 13 – August 1, 2018

TIME: 5-6:30 PM (ET)

Learn to coach social and emotional intelligence and become certified to administer the Social + Emotional Intelligence Profile (SEIP)® in our highly-acclaimed online course.

This course is conveniently delivered online by webinar, so there’s no need for expensive travel or time out of the office. Classes meet once a week for eight weeks. Each class is an action-packed 90 minutes, highly interactive, with a variety of case studies discussed. Upon completion you’ll earn 12 credits from the ICF, HRCI, or SHRM and receive a free listing in our online coach directory.

Your commitment is $1799 and includes:

  • Our EQ Coaching Toolkit with 200+ pages of worksheets, exercises and other tools you can use to bring social and emotional intelligence training and coaching into your practice
  • Customizable PowerPoint presentations for workshops and trainings
  • Certification to administer both the self and 360-versions of The Social + Emotional Intelligence Profile-Self (SEIP)®, the most comprehensive, statistically-reliable, scientifically-validated instrument on the market today
  • 10 free Social + Emotional Intelligence Profile (SEIP)® credits — a $750 value!

Classes are kept small and availability is limited.

Attendees are expected to attend all 8 sessions, but we know life gets busy. We record the sessions in case you need to miss a class or two. A self-study program is available as well if that works better for your schedule.

Join our team of elite social + emotional intelligence coaches today!

“The individual S+EI assessment along with a coaching session is a real eye opener for people and an awareness of how little they know about themselves. I can’t wait to do a 360 Assessment.”

Institute for Social + Emotional Intelligence | www.the-isei.com | info@isei.org

Upcoming Classes