Power Up

Article contributed by guest author Marnette Falley, ACC

Want to feel calm, cool, collected—and like you’re the one who’s in charge of your life? Use these 5 strategies to tap into your personal power.

No one wants to feel like a doormat—and you don’t want to be a bull in a china shop, either. You do want to say what’s on your mind without blowing it or blowing up. You want to feel confident. You want to feel prepared for life’s challenges. Who doesn’t?

Getting closer to those beautiful (and sometimes lofty feeling) goals grows out of self understanding. Labeled more specifically, these behaviors reflect “personal power.”

In fact, personal power is one of 26 Emotional Intelligence (EQ) competencies. Emotional intelligence describes your ability to notice, understand and manage your emotions and your behavior. Strength in emotional intelligence puts you in a position to make clearer and more satisfying choices in challenging situations and in your relationships with others.

People who demonstrate lots of personal power feel a calm conviction about who they really are. They’re confident that they can get the things they want and need in life. They tend to define their view of themselves internally, leaning on their strengths and capabilities to fuel their self image rather than leaning on external factors like their title or social standing.

On the flip side, if you don’t exercise your personal power as much, you may find that you hesitate to try new things, pull back rather than saying what’s on your mind, and struggle to set clear boundaries.

As with all areas of emotional intelligence, practicing personal power is not a characteristic that you get or don’t get. Instead, it’s a set of behaviors that you can practice. Try these five strategies to stretch in this area:

  1. Celebrate your successes

Make a list of the 10 most interesting things you’ve ever done. Then make a list of your 10 biggest wins. And remember, they don’t all have to be about work or school accomplishments. (Although, feel free to include those!) Think about what you’ve achieved as a member of your family, in your hobbies, as a volunteer, or related to your personal development.

We’re wired to remember negative experiences more easily than the positives of our day or week. So I also recommend keeping a weekly list of wins. Leave a little space on your weekly to-do list, and write down at least one thing that went well every day. When I look back at my own list, I regularly see I had far more wins that I would otherwise ever remember. If you do this consistently, you can look back over a month or six months and see all the great progress you’ve made that you might otherwise discount or take for granted. Pausing to notice what went well and reviewing your wins periodically fills your confidence bucket.

2. Acknowledge your strengths

It’s easy to take our own super powers for granted and wish for the ones we don’t have. But you have strengths that everyone else wants, too. You may hardly notice that you’re doing something that’s hard for other people, because it’s so easy for you. Take a minute, and really appreciate those special talents, aptitudes and skills that you bring to the table. Maybe you see trends in data or behaviors. Maybe you’re the glue that holds your groups together. Maybe you have a special gift for inspiring others to get things done. Or maybe you’re the one who can keep the trains running on time. You do great things. Take a minute to remember that.

3. Explore the gap.

It could be that you tap into your personal power in some kinds of situations, but not in others. Think about the times when you’ve struggled to hit the balance you’re looking for on assertiveness. What do those situations have in common? How could you feel more confident in those situations? Maybe there’s specific training that would help you feel more armed. Or maybe more preparation for those moments would help you stay centered and focused on your goal for the conversation or the meeting.

4. Learn from your best outcomes.

When were you at your best? Make a list of times that you achieved or came closest to achieving your perfect level of assertiveness. You said no, and so nicely that everyone still left smiling. You stepped up and pointed out a weakness in your bosses idea without getting fired. What can you learn from that peak performance? What did you do that time that you could try again the next time you’re preparing for a situation where you feel like you struggle with personal power?

5. Find someone else who does this well.

There’s usually at least one person in any company or organization that can have the conversations that the rest of us shy away from. Who’s that person in your life? What do they do differently than you? What can you learn from that? As you think about this, remember to focus on their behaviors, not on their characteristics.

Remember, no one hits their perfect mark 100 percent of the time. Even if you’re focused, you’ll have times you wish you’d been stronger in your presentation and times when you’ll feel like you pushed too hard. This isn’t a win-lose situation—you’re learning what works for you. And the more options you try, the more opportunities you have to expand the range of strategies that work for you.

Confidence. You’ve got this.

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